Three Ways to Guard Against Added Uniform Rental Charges

If your company relies on uniform rental services, you may want to scrutinize your invoices closely throughout 2017. Uniform rental companies have started adding on various garment insurance charges that may not fit your company’s actual usage and that can cause your bill to skyrocket if you are not aware of the extra charges.

The current trend is for rental uniform companies to add insurance charges to your bill on a non-voluntary basis.

Garment insurance, which is a usually a voluntary charge, can mitigate the cost of replacing rental uniforms that are damaged. The cost can range from $0.02 - $0.16 cents per garment and can be useful if your company has to replace uniforms regularly, because you’ll have already covered the cost of replacements and curb bill fluctuations associated with renting new uniforms. Additional charges can include emblem and uniform prep insurance, to create a new uniform for an employee. In certain professions, such as welding or mining, garment insurance can be very beneficial because garments can be damaged frequently. However, in other industries, like hospitality, such insurance is usually an unnecessary add on. Some companies are also extending insurance to items like floor mats, which again, is excessive.

However, there are a few ways that you can get around these added charges on your invoice.

Assess your usage

It’s important to establish a baseline for whether garment insurance is a product that your organization genuinely needs. You should measure the overall charges for uniform loss/damage for 6 to 12 months to determine exactly how much is spent on garment replacements and if garment insurance would be financially beneficial.

Check your invoices

Always check your invoices for any charges or fees that you don’t recognize, and if you see additional charges or an invoice total that has increased, call up your supplier and challenge any unexplained changes since your previous invoice.

Address added charges in your contract

This may also be an opportune time to review your current contract and verify how additional charges/fees are outlined within your agreement. See if you can negotiate that no additional fees be incurred during your current contract or include a clause that would allow you to terminate the contract. It may also be appropriate to reach out to a third party to negotiate a better deal on your company’s behalf.

Garment insurance charges could become the industry norm, but by taking the time to monitor your invoice and analyze your uniform replacement needs, you can better hedge against such changes. 

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